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Health Information

Lifestyle Changes to Manage Prostate Cancer

By adopting certain lifestyle habits, you can help speed your recovery from prostate cancer.

General Guidelines

  • Rest when tired .
  • Do not smoke .
  • Eat a balanced diet .
  • Exercise .
Rest When Tired

Radiation therapy and hormonal therapy can add to the fatigue you already feel from fighting cancer. It is important to allow your body to rest. This will help your body have the strength to heal itself.

Do Not Smoke

Smoking exposes your body to many cancer-causing chemicals. Some data shows that smoking makes your tumor less responsive to the effects of radiation. If you smoke, quit .

Eat a Balanced Diet

Good nutrition is essential for health and well-being. To aid in your recovery, make sure you are getting all the nutrients that your body needs for healing. Try to increase your intake of fruits, vegetables , whole grains , and high-fiber foods .

Exercise

Once you have been given the okay by your doctor, participate in an exercise program . For example, walking every day can help you to feel better, even when you are receiving treatment. Exercise may increase the amount of energy that you have during the day.

When to Contact Your Doctor

If you feel extreme fatigue or severe pain, talk with your doctor. It is important to know your limits when you are recovering from cancer.

Revision Information

  • Detailed guide: prostate cancer. American Cancer Society website. Available at: http://www.cancer.org. Accessed October 9, 2008.

  • Prostate cancer. National Cancer Institute website. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/prostate. Accessed October 9, 2008.

  • 1/15/2010 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance. http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php. Griffith K, Wenzel J, et al. Impact of a walking intervention on cardiorespiratory fitness, self-reported physical function, and pain in patients undergoing treatment for solid tumors. Cancer. 2009;115(20):4874-4884.